Beyond the Bench - Thursday, December 15, 2011

Concurrent Workshops 1
9:30 - 10:45 A.M.


Brief Solution-Focused Child Custody Mediation: Approaches and Skills

What are the mediator skills necessary for working effectively with the parties in a limited amount of time? In any given group of separating parents, some may have minor custody/visitation disagreements, may be near agreement, and, with mediator assistance, can arrive at a mutually agreeable parenting plan in a brief period of time. Learn how some courts utilize “day of court” mediation and others the orientation process to provide these families with a more immediate level of assistance. Learn how brief approaches are supported in the professional literature.

Ms. Patricia Foster, Director, Family Court and Special Services, Superior Court of Tulare County
Mr. John Summers, Director, Family Court Services, Superior Court of Yuba County
Mr. Tim Van Schooten, Director, Family Court Services, Superior Court of Shasta County

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California Dependency Online Guide (CalDOG) Website Training

The California Dependency Online Guide (CalDOG) is a resource website that provides high quality, juvenile dependency-related legal and nonlegal information to California attorneys, judicial officers, social workers, and other child welfare professionals. This workshop will be an introductory training, for those with little or no experience using the website, or users who feel they would like more information about how to use all of the features of the website. There will be an opportunity to ask questions and provide feedback and suggestions. The workshop will be offered twice, at workshop sessions I and II. Following the workshops, the room will remain open through lunch, and CalDOG staff will be available to answer questions and conduct tutorials.

Ms. Mara Bernstein, Senior Attorney, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts
Ms. Kelly Parrish, Staff Analyst, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts

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Children’s Participation in Family Law Cases

Child custody and parenting time cases often involve a host of issues requiring complex decision-making by the court as well as the involvement of attorneys, mediators, and mental health professionals. This workshop will primarily focus on children’s participation in family law matters and build on the experience of faculty with juvenile dependency cases where children more routinely participate. Content will include a discussion about why children of various ages often want to testify or participate in court proceedings, and how court-connected professionals and judicial officers can meet new legal requirements while effectively managing witnesses of various ages and appropriately analyzing and weighing children’s testimony or input. The panel will cover changes to the Family Code and the new statewide rule of court, effective January 1, 2012. Faculty perspectives will include the views of attorneys representing children and parents, and a judge with both family law andjuvenile dependency experience.

Hon. Jerilyn Borack, Judge, Superior Court of Sacramento County
Dr. Frank Dougherty, Attorney
Ms. Lorie Nachlis, Attorney, Nachlis & Fink

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Facebook Isn’t Just for Friends: Examining the Use of Social Networks by Employers, Law Enforcement, and Others

Your friends or future friends aren't the only people using social networks. Employers, law enforcement personnel, lawyers, and others are using social networks for far more than socializing. This presentation for youth and adults will examine some of those other uses of social networks and how these uses may affect you from a practical, legal, and policy standpoint. It will also cover recent decisions and laws relating to sexting, cyberbullying, and free speech.

Mr. Shane Witnov, Litigation Associate, Winston & Strawn, LLP

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Family Law Legal Update

In addition to many legislative changes and new case law this year, several statewide family law rules and form changes will become effective January 1, 2012. This workshop will cover these changes and provide an opportunity for all participants to learn about how these changes might impact their work. The workshop will be
relevant to judicial officers, mediators and child custody recommending counselors, evaluators, attorneys, and other court-connected professionals.

Hon. Michael J. Gassner, Commissioner, Superior Court of San Bernardino County
Hon. Mark A. Juhas, Judge, Superior Court of Los Angeles County

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Hot Topics in Dependency

This workshop will provide an analysis of the most important case law and statutory changes that affected the juvenile dependency court in 2011.

Hon. Jacqueline H. Lewis, Commissioner, Superior Court of Los Angeles County
Hon. Anthony Trendacosta, Commissioner, Superior Court of Los Angeles County

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Meeting the Needs of Litigants with Limited English Proficiency

With over 200 languages spoken in California, how can the courts ensure that their services are accessible to litigants who have limited or no English proficiency? Learn about new efforts by the Department of Justice and the American Bar Association to address these concerns and hear about a variety of creative strategies to address this major issue.

Hon. Erica Yew, Judge, Superior Court of Santa Clara County
Ms. Ana Maria Garcia, Supervising Attorney, Neighborhood Legal Services of Los Angeles County
Ms. Mary Lou Aranguren, Court Interpreter, Superior Court of Alameda County

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Restorative Justice – A Delinquency Justice Model That Works!

Fresno has successfully implemented Community Justice Conferencing (CJC), a unique predisposition restorative justice program in collaboration with the Public Defender, District Attorney, Probation and the courts. CJC brings juvenile offenders together with their victims in a safe environment to address the violation, restore equity, and clarify future intentions. This interactive workshop will provide information about program effectiveness, victim and offender satisfaction, and offer means by which the program might be replicated.

Hon. David A. Gottlieb, Juvenile Presiding Judge, Superior Court of Fresno County
Mr. Rudy Carrillo, Chief Deputy District Attorney, Juvenile Justice Court Unit, Fresno County Office of the District Attorney
Mr. Craig Downing, Probation Services Manager, Fresno County Probation Department
Ms. Noelle Nightingale, Executive Director, Victim Offender Reconciliation Program and Community Justice Conferencing
Ms. Antoinette Taillac, Attorney, Fresno County Office of the Public Defender

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Revisioning Juvenile Justice: Developing The Fiscal Argument for Change

States across the nation faced with challenging fiscal times are rethinking prior approaches to juvenile justice and long-term incarceration of youth. Just as California is struggling with realignment and prison downsizing, other states have developed their own new approaches to juvenile incarceration as well as prevention strategies. This workshop will examine innovations and new approaches developed elsewhere, with a particular focus on fiscal drivers of reform. Panelists will also discuss cost/benefit analyses of reform initiatives, and how to use these fiscal arguments to develop bipartisan alliances for change.

Ms. Miriam Krinsky, Lecturer, University of California at Los Angeles, School of Public Affairs
Mr. Barry Krisberg, Research and Policy Director of the Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy,
University of California at Berkeley, Boalt Hall
Mr. Marc Levin, Executive Director, Right on Crime
Mr. David Muhammad, Chief Probation Officer, Alameda County Probation Department
Mr. Robert Schwartz, Executive Director, Juvenile Law Center

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The Importance of Domestic Violence Coordinating Councils

In today's environment of limited resources, developing and maintaining the lines of communication among members of the community, community-based services, advocates, justice system entities, and the courts is crucial to fostering victim safety, perpetrator accountability, and child well-being when domestic violence is a factor. This workshop will focus on how to set up a viable domestic violence council, delineate the advantages and some of the pitfalls, and provide concrete examples of the benefits of flourishing domestic violence councils to large and small communities. It will also emphasize the vital role of the court in sustaining a successful council. For judicial officer participants, this course helps meet the requirement of CRC 10.464 for domestic violence education.|

Hon. Leonard Edwards (Ret.), Judge-in-Residence, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts
Hon. Katherine Lucero, Judge, Superior Court of Santa Clara County
Hon. Dean T. Stout, Assistant Presiding Judge, Superior Court of Inyo County
Ms. Virginia Bird, Assistant Court Executive Officer, Superior Court of Inyo County
Ms. Kathy Moore, Associate Director, California Partnership to End Domestic Violence

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The Role of the Court in Fostering Collaboration and Local Systemic Change

Juvenile courts have the duty to protect, rehabilitate, and reunify children and families in the dependency and delinquency systems. Local courts play a key role in making systemic change. This session will focus on successful local collaborative efforts and how to facilitate systemic change, even in tight fiscal times.

Hon. Michael Nash, Juvenile Presiding Judge, Superior Court of Los Angeles County
Hon. Trina Thompson, Juvenile Presiding Judge, Superior Court of Alameda County
Hon. Patrick Tondreau, Juvenile Presiding Judge, Juvenile Justice Supervising Judge, Superior Court of Santa Clara County
Ms. Diane Nunn, Director, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts (Moderator)

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Tribal Court Live (Mock Trial): Understanding How Tribal Courts Work and How to Work With Them

This workshop will be a "mock trial" lead by Hon. Claudette White, Chief Judge of the Quechan Tribal Court. The trial will involve a marital dissolution case and will explore issues of child custody, division of property, and protective orders. It will examine some of the jurisdictional issues that may arise in tribal court and between tribal and state courts and how those issues can be addressed and resolved.

Hon. Juan Ulloa, Judge, Superior Court of Imperial County
Hon. Claudette White, Chief Judge, Quechan Tribal Court

Concurrent Workshops 2
11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.


California Dependency Online Guide (CalDOG) Website Training

The California Dependency Online Guide (CalDOG) is a resource website that provides high quality, juvenile dependency-related legal and nonlegal information to California attorneys, judicial officers, social workers, and other child welfare professionals. This workshop will be an introductory training, for those with little or no experience using the website, or users who feel they would like more information about how to use all of the features of the website. There will be an opportunity to ask questions and provide feedback and suggestions. The workshop will be offered twice, at workshop sessions I and II. Following the workshops, the room will remain open through lunch, and CalDOG staff will be available to answer questions and conduct tutorials.

Ms. Mara Bernstein, Senior Attorney, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts
Ms. Kelly Parrish, Staff Analyst, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts

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Family Law Domestic Violence: New Forms, Rules, and Cases

Many new forms and rules related to domestic violence restraining orders are taking effect January 1, 2012, including a new form and rule for parties to stipulate to parentage. In addition, forms related to restraining orders issued in juvenile, civil harassment, elder abuse, and other case types are changing. Panelists will highlight the major forms and rules changes, new legislation, and key new cases. For judicial officer participants, this course helps meet the requirement of CRC 10.464 for domestic violence education.

Hon. Kimberly J. Nystrom-Geist, Judge, Superior Court of Fresno County
Ms. Tamara Abrams, Senior Attorney, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts

Family Law Settlement Services: Developing Protocols for Domestic Violence Cases

Many family law cases benefit tremendously from the opportunity to use settlement services to craft resolutions addressing property and financial matters. Given the number of family law cases involving domestic violence allegations, restraining orders, or unreported fear of abuse or retaliation, how can settlement service providers most effectively ensure that programs take safety into account? This workshop will provide participants with examples of protocols and procedures for handling this issue in non-child custody programs and discuss why it is important to consider domestic violence when providing settlement services.

Dr. Deborah Chase, Senior Attorney, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts
Ms. Julia Weber, Supervising Attorney, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts

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From the Depths of Hate: An In-Depth Look at the Life of a Former White Supremacist

From the Depths of Hate is a powerful presentation that takes an in-depth look at the life of a former White Supremacist, Tim Zaal. Mr. Zaal will discuss the role that propaganda played in his induction into the White Supremacy movement and detail the events surrounding his departure from the movement.

Mr. Timothy Zaal, Speaker, Museum of Tolerance

Guardianship Crossover Issues: Probate and Juvenile Courts

The recent case, In re Guardianship of Christian G., spotlighted the relationship between juvenile and probate guardianships. A brief discussion will be held on the holdings in the Christian G. case and the companion case of In re Guardianship of H.C. Faculty will engage in a discussion of the roles of juvenile and probate court
stakeholders in these guardianship cases.

Hon. Dean T. Stout, Assistant Presiding Judge, Superior Court of Inyo County
Ms. Dana Crom, County Counsel, Inyo County Counsel Office
Mr. Jim Paulsen, Administrator, Probate & Family Court, Superior Court of Contra Costa County
Ms. Debra Zanders-Willis, Director, San Diego County Child Welfare Services

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Helping Members of the Military: Using Collaboration to Address the Complex Needs of Service Members and Veterans

Participants will learn strategies for providing outreach services, including direct access to legal services and offsite court hearings to homeless veterans, or those at risk of becoming homeless, through collaboration with local veterans’ agencies, child support agencies, law school(s), court staff, facilitator’s offices, and the private bar. Participants will also learn how to develop veterans’ outreach programs aimed at preventing homelessness. Panelists will also explain how to develop a local court program with the private bar and the military to respond to the challenge of active duty service members who do not appear at a hearing, but are guaranteed legal representation and an automatic stay of proceedings under the Service Members Civil Relief Act.

Hon. Adam Wertheimer, Commissioner, Superior Court of San Diego County
Mr. Steven Berenson, Professor of Law, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Ms. Susan Groves, Family Law Facilitator, Superior Court of San Diego County
Mr. John A. Schweitzer, Attorney, Stassinopoulos & Schweitzer, APLC
Ms. Shannon Welton, Supervising Attorney, San Diego County Department of Child Support Services

Practical Strategies for Handling Compassion Fatigue, a.k.a. Secondary Trauma

Judges, attorneys, social workers, and psychologists who work with children and families, are directly and indirectly affected by the trauma these people often experience when they are involved in difficult court proceedings. Such secondary effects sometimes result in decreased performance and significant health risks. This practical and interactive session introduces stress management techniques and strategies that can be integrated both off and on the job without interrupting productivity. Participants will be encouraged and prompted to understand their vulnerabilities, recognize early their own and colleagues’ warning signs of secondary stress, and use self-care strategies to quickly regain a state of neuro-physiological regulation.


Ms. Beverly Kyer, Consultant, The Kyer Group

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Integrating Signs of Safety and Structured-Decision Making in Child Welfare Practice

This workshop will demonstrate how the Signs of Safety tools can be used in conjunction with the Structured Decision Making tools to enhance child welfare practice and decision-making.

Mr. Phil Decter, Associate Director, Family-Centered Services Project
Dr. Raelene Freitag, Director, Children’s Research Center

Substance Abuse Issues in the Courts: Applying Collaborative Court Principles

Courts throughout the state have been addressing substance abuse issues for many years through the use of a variety of approaches, including collaborative courts. However, these courts are being challenged by reductions in resources, increasing demand for services, and changing demographics and needs. This workshop will address how collaborative courts are responding to these challenges with innovative approaches, including the use of evidence-based practices, family systems models, and more effective community collaborations and partnerships.

Hon. Rogelio R. Flores, Judge, Superior Court of Santa Barbara County
Hon. Katherine Lucero, Judge, Superior Court of Santa Clara County
Ms. Deborah Cima, Treatment Court Coordinator, Superior Court of San Bernardino County

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Tattoos on the Heart: Gang Members from a Family Perspective

Father Gregory Boyle, a favorite presenter at the AOC’s Beyond the Bench Conference and the Family Dispute Resolution Statewide Educational Institute, has authored a recent book, Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion. Father Boyle’s ministry has focused on working with gang members in East Los Angeles
for over two decades. Gang members may find themselves in a number of court settings, including family, juvenile dependency and delinquency, and collaborative courts such as reentry and drug courts. What do judges, mediators, collaborative court coordinators, and justice system partners need to know that will help them as they interact with gang members in their respective settings? For example, how can courts effectively address family-related issues, since a large percentage of gang members are parents of young children? Father Boyle’s presentation will include homegirls sharing their experiences and addressing questions from attendees.

Father Gregory J. Boyle, S.J., Executive Director, Homeboy Industries, Los Angeles
Ms. Emily Chapa, Staff, Homeboy Industries, Los Angeles
Ms. Tammi White, Staff, Homeboy Industries, Los Angeles

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The Disappearing District Attorney: Are Prosecutors Choosing a New Role in the Juvenile Courtroom and at the Policy Table?

Have our courtroom practice and political discourse moved away from public safety and victims’ rights? Has the advocacy community alienated district attorneys such that they are no longer willing to come to the policy table? This workshop will seek to clarify and redefine the DA’s role in today’s juvenile justice system.

Mr. Matt Golde, Assistant District Attorney, Office of the District Attorney, Alameda County
Mr. David M. Meyers, Senior Attorney, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts

The Impact of the Economy on Parenting and Parent-Child Contact

How do mediators and the courts effectively work with parents affected by the economy and financial hardship? Separating couples may initially come to court, or return to court, with a change of circumstances due to job loss and/or income reduction. This may lead to lifestyle changes that significantly affect parenting, including housing
challenges such as move-away situations. How can parenting plans realistically address the parties’ changed circumstances? What are some resources that may be available to parents facing these challenges?

Hon. Sue Alexander, Commissioner, Superior Court of Alameda County
Ms. Betty Creary, 211 Outreach Manager, United Way of the Bay Area
Ms. Susan Finch, Family Court Services Specialist, Superior Court of Los Angeles County

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Tribal Customary Adoption – Lessons Learned

This session will discuss experiences in implementing California's tribal customary adoption law since it went into effect on July 1, 2010. Panelists will include participants in a tribal customary adoption case in San Francisco that recently finalized. We will hear perspectives on tribal customary adoption (TCA) from the tribal attorney, county counsel, minor’s attorney, social worker, and the attorney for the adoptive parents, and the panelists will discuss the challenges they faced in implementing TCA as a permanent plan.

Ms. Diana M. Carbajal-Strait, Deputy City Attorney, San Francisco Office of City Attorney
Ms. Kimberly Cluff, Attorney, Forman & Associates
Mr. Mark Wasacz, Attorney, Wasacz Hilley & Fullerton LLP

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Lunch Plenary 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

Coming of Age in Tough Times: Building Our Strength Together

Author of a recent book, Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion, and founder of Homeboy Industries, Father Gregory Boyle has worked with gang members in East Los Angeles for over two decades. This year’s Beyond the Bench theme is certainly one that Father Boyle sees again and again in his work. “Coming of Age,” diverting from the gang path, is not an easy or simple journey. It takes “Strength Together.” Homeboy Industries and its programs embody the diversity of approaches, the pieces of the mosaic, to equip youth to move from gang activity to effective contribution to neighborhood, family, and society. Education, parenting classes, case management, specialized services for substance abuse and domestic violence, including Relapse Prevention, 12- step meetings, a court-certified Batterers Treatment Program, and a domestic violence survivors group augment Homeboy Industries job programs. This hope in the individual’s ability to transform his/her life, buoyed by a supportive network, is one shared by both Homeboy Industries and family/juvenile/collaborative courts. Programs implement a problem-solving/restorative justice approach by working with one individual and family at a time. Father Boyle will inspire us to “build our strength together."

Father Gregory J. Boyle, S.J., Executive Director, Homeboy Industries, Los Angeles

Concurrent Workshops 3
2:00–3:15 P.M.


California’s Juvenile Justice System: Re-Tooling or Rudderless?

Juvenile Justice reform over the past 10 years has been significant, but where do we go from here? Find out what the new terrain looks like through the eyes of a judge, two youth advocates, and a chief probation officer. This workshop will explore where we have been and where we need to go to improve our delinquency system through realignment. It will examine the changing role of probation under adult and juvenile realignment; the implications of social science research for next steps in juvenile system reform; the role of realignment in addressing the needs of special populations, such as those with mental health care needs; how budgetary factors such as commitment penalties and downsizing proposals may produce unintended consequences; the need for state level policy and leadership in juvenile justice; and other cutting edge issues.

Hon. Kurt Kumli, Judge, Superior Court of Santa Clara County
Ms. Sue Burrell, Staff Attorney, Youth Law Center
Ms. Linda Penner, Chief Probation Officer of the Fresno County Probation Department, President of Chief Probation Officers of California
Mr. David Steinhart, Director, Commonweal Juvenile Justice Program

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Collaborative Courts in Action: An Evaluation of Alameda County’s Juvenile Mental Health Court

This workshop will provide an overview of mental health courts and results of a recent evaluation of one juvenile mental health court. Panelists will discuss the goals and the essential elements of mental health courts, as well as the outcomes and effectiveness of one juvenile mental health court.

Hon. Leopoldo (Leo) Dorado, Judge, Superior Court of Alameda County
Mr. Brian Blalock, Staff Attorney, Bay Area Legal Aid
Mr. Patrick Gardner, Deputy Director, National Center for Youth Law

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Creating and Sustaining a Youth Court

Youth courts provide positive alternative sanctions for first-time youth offenders, which results in reduced recidivism rates. Youth courts in California conduct hundreds of hearings annually, with an overwhelming percentage of respondents completing their sanctions as ordered. Every year, hundreds of young people in California serve as judges, jurors, and advocates. Expanding youth courts is an effective strategy for reducing juvenile delinquency, allowing young people to take responsibility for their actions and learn community engagement skills. Hear from the president and former president of the California Association of Youth Courts on how to create and sustain a youth court in your jurisdiction.

Hon. J. Richard Couzens (Ret.), Judge, Superior Court of Placer County
Hon. David S. Wesley, Assistant Presiding Judge, Superior Court of Los Angeles County

Cultural Humility: Working in Partnership with Our Multicultural Court Users

This session introduces the concept of cultural humility as we serve a multicultural population using the courts. Besides providing culturally competent services, cultural humility allows us to develop a lifelong commitment to self-evaluation, to redressing power imbalances between providers and consumers, and to developing mutually beneficial and nonpaternalistic partnerships with the communities we serve. Rather than learning to identify and respond to sets of culturally specific traits, using cultural humility the service provider develops and practices a process of self-awareness and reflection.

Ms. Alejandra Siroka, Certified Court Interpreter, Language Alchemy

Family Law: What Teens and Young Parents Need to Know

This workshop will educate teens and young parents on their legal rights concerning restraining orders, child custody and support, paternity, emancipation, and other issues. We will discuss the family court system and how and when youth should access this system. The workshop will use specific real life stories to explain how family law plays out in the real world for teens and young parents.

Ms. Sharon Balmer-Cartegena, Family Law Attorney, Los Angeles Center for Law and Justice

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Human Trafficking: An Overview and Special Focus on Commercially Sexually Exploited Children (SCEC)

Human trafficking arises in a wide variety of case types and may involve an array of allegations ranging from sexual exploitation to forced labor. This workshop will provide a brief overview of the legal and social science definitions of human trafficking and where it might arise in a court setting. Faculty will focus in particular on the unique features of commercially sexually exploited children (CSEC) and highlight characteristics of victims, perpetrators, dynamics, and risk factors. The workshop will also address broad goals of services and treatment for exploited children and the increasing need for court leadership in this critical area.

Hon. Douglas Hatchimonji, Supervising Juvenile Judge, Superior Court of Orange County
Hon. Catherine J. Pratt, Commissioner, Superior Court of Los Angeles County

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Organizing and Managing the Flow of Family Law Cases

Panelists will discuss the fundamental principles and goals of caseflow management in family law. Specific examples of local court procedures currently used in California family courts to track, organize, and manage cases will be provided. Panelists will also discuss the role of caseflow management as an essential infrastructure to support judicial case management of cases requiring a family-centered case resolution plan.

Hon. Lorna A. Alksne, Judge, Superior Court of San Diego County
Ms. Linda Daeley, Family Law Manager, Superior Court of Orange County
Mr. Jose Guillen, Chief Executive Officer, Superior Court of Sonoma County

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Parallel Parenting: When Co-Parenting May Be Too Much to Expect

Is parallel parenting a better approach than co-parenting for some parents and circumstances? During a mediation session, it may become clear that co-parenting may be out of reach for some parents, at least at the present time. Is parallel parenting a better-suited approach to their parenting plan and expectations? Key elements of parallel parenting will be discussed. Insights from the research of John Gottman and from Connie Ahrons’ spectrum of separating couples will also be included.

Ms. Nadine Blaschak-Brown, Senior Court Services Analyst, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts
Mr. George Ferrick, Supervising Court Services Analyst, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts
Ms. Amy Rudd, Director, Family Court Services, Superior Court of Placer County

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Public Safety Realignment Overview: The Architecture of Change

This workshop, presented by the Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO), will provide an overview of the major components of the 2011 realignment legislation that was approved as part of the 2011–12 state budget. The presentation will focus on the major policy change to shift the responsibility for supervising certain prisoners and parolees from the state to local governments, including how these changes and others are likely to impact the courts, including collaborative courts. The presentation will cover the mechanics of realignment, as well as how it will be funded. The LAO will also discuss its recommendations on how to structure realignment for longterm success, the new evidence-based tools made available to local governments in the legislation, and an overview of how counties are beginning to implement the realignment locally.

Mr. Brian Brown, Principal Fiscal and Policy Analyst, Legislative Analyst’s Office, Sacramento
Mr. Drew Soderborg, Senior Fiscal and Policy Analyst, Legislative Analyst’s Office, Sacramento

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Recognition and Enforcement of Tribal Protective Orders

Providing for the justice needs of tribal communities is a challenge. One way that tribes, both inside and outside California, seek to meet this challenge is by developing their own court systems. Today there are close to twenty tribal courts operating in California and over 300 tribal courts nationwide. A priority for many of these courts is the development of protective/restraining order protocols to ensure the safety of their citizens. Historically, a lack of awareness and understanding of tribal courts has impeded the effectiveness of restraining orders issued by tribal courts and undermined the safety of tribal victims. In this session, tribal and state court judges will
discuss jurisdiction on tribal lands and in tribal court, federal and state law concerning enforcement and recognition of tribal court protective orders, existing procedures for the mutual recognition and enforcement of protective orders, and proposed changes to the California Rules of Court.

Hon. Richard C. Blake, Chief Judge, Hoopa Valley Tribal Court
Hon. Dean T. Stout, Assistant Presiding Judge, Superior Court of Inyo County
Hon. Claudette White, Chief Judge, Quechan Tribal Court

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Strategies for Reducing the Long-Term Foster Care Population

This workshop will focus on interconnected initiatives to reduce long term foster care, including the federally funded California Partners for Permanency; local collaborative work to effectively implement family finding and engagement strategies; and state-level efforts that actively involve the voice of children, youth and families in efforts to reduce disproportionality, and improve policy, service delivery, and outcomes for children and families who are involved in the child welfare system.

Mr. Bob Friend, Director, Center for Family Finding and Youth Connectedness at Seneca Center
Ms. Karen Gunderson, Chief, Child & Youth Permanency Branch, California Department of Social Services
Ms. Katie Howard, California Unemployment Insurance Appeals Board
Mr. Donald Pickens, Chair, California State Parent Team

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Uses of Technology to Assist Self-Represented Litigants

This workshop will discuss how technology has been adapted at numerous courts to assist self-represented litigants. Panelists will emphasize the ways technology can be used to increase the number of litigants assisted and improve the quality of assistance.

Ms. Susan Groves, Family Law Facilitator, Superior Court of San Diego County
Mr. Harry Jacobs, Senior Attorney, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts
Ms. Leigh Parsons, Supervising Attorney, Self-Help Center/Family Law Facilitator’s Office, Superior Court of Santa Clara County
Mr. Bill Tanner, Supervising Attorney, Legal Aid Society of Orange County

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CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS 4
3:30–4:45 P.M.


California's Fostering Connections Act (AB 12 / AB 212)

This workshop will provide a basic overview of the legislation that expands foster care eligibility to children between the ages of 18 and 21. This overview workshop is intended for social workers, psychologists, attorneys, case managers, and others wanting to know the basics of AB12 and AB212.

Ms. Aleta Beaupied, Senior Attorney, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts
Ms. Lindsay Elliott, Fostering Connections Project Attorney, Children’s Law Center of Los Angeles
Ms. Kathy Watkins, Legislative Program Manager, San Bernardino County Human Services System

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Brain Injury in Presumed Child Abuse Cases: Difficulties in Diagnoses

In this workshop, child neurologist Dr. Charles Niesen will discuss brain anatomy, and injuries involved in shaken baby syndrome, and new research that focuses on differentiating accidental from non-accidental head trauma. He will present common and rare medical conditions that can mimic the appearance of child abuse. Dr. Niesen
will also discuss the role of retinal hemorrhages in diagnosing child abuse, other causes for subdural hematomas, and the role of the child neurologist in evaluating these injuries.

Dr. Charles Niesen, Pediatric Neurologist, AMS Neurology

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Child Support and Tribal Communities: Myths and Realities

With the growing number of tribal courts, tribal TANF agencies, tribal child support agencies, and the growth of the 107 recognized tribes in California as major employers, tribal/state court jurisdiction in general and child support matters in particular have become an emerging area of the law affecting many families in California. This session brings together a tribal judge, a local child support attorney, and the State Department of Child Support Services Tribal Liaison for a discussion of where we are jurisdictionally and collaboratively, and where we hope to be in the future.

Hon. Richard C. Blake, Chief Judge, Hoopa Valley Tribal Court
Mr. George Chance, Tribal Liaison, Program Policy Branch, California Department of Child Support Services
Mr. Allan Woodworth, Supervising Child Support Attorney, Humboldt County Department of Child Support Services

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Collaborative Courts in the Delinquency System: Juvenile Mental Health, Drug, and Reentry Courts

This workshop will introduce collaborative court concepts that have been successfully applied in the juvenile delinquency setting, including juvenile mental health, drug, and reentry courts. Panelists will discuss early results from pilot efforts, explain the importance of assessment and monitoring, and engage in a discussion about the future of collaborative approaches in the juvenile delinquency system.

Hon. Kathleen Kelly, Judge, Superior Court of San Francisco County
Hon. Kurt Kumli, Judge, Superior Court of Santa Clara County
Ms. Vanessa Alvarez, Youth Advocate, City and County of San Francisco, Office of the Public Defender, Juvenile Division
Ms. Allison Magee, Deputy Director, San Francisco Juvenile Probation Department
Ms. Rebecca Marcus, Public Defender, City and County of San Francisco, Office of the Public Defender
Mr. Kwanza Morton, Deputy Probation Officer, San Francisco County Probation Department
Mr. Daniel Reyes, Clinical Case Coordinator

Dependency Mediation: Benefits, Outcomes, and Cost Savings For All

Looking for a way to save time and money without sacrificing the judicial branch goals of access, fairness, and quality of justice and service to the public? Juvenile dependency mediation is being used by many courts and is a service that is recognized and encouraged by the California Welfare and Institutions Code, the Blue Ribbon
Commission on Children in Foster Care, nationwide research studies, and a recent appellate ruling. Panelists will answer questions such as why mediation should be incorporated as a core function of the court, how to sustain a referral process in times of transition, and how, even in these difficult economic times when we are cutting
services, dependency mediation will save the court time and money and provide better outcomes for all.

Hon. Leonard Edwards (Ret.), Judge-in-Residence, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts
Hon. Denine J. Guy, Judge, Superior Court of Santa Cruz County
Ms. Kim Harmon, Manager, Family Court Services, Superior Court of San Francisco County

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How to Encourage More Pro Bono and Limited Scope Representation

With a growing number of litigants coming to court without attorneys, many judges and court administrators are interested in increasing representation for litigants in the courtroom. Pro bono and limited scope representation (also known as unbundling) provide some options. The panelists will discuss what judges can and cannot do to encourage pro bono and limited scope representation, including encouraging attorneys to tak eportions of juvenile cases that cannot be paid for by court funds. They will review the law on obtaining attorney fees for limited scope representation and share the wide variety of resources available to help attorneys provide
those services ethically and appropriately.

Hon. Mark A. Juhas, Judge, Superior Court of Los Angeles County
Hon. Laurie D. Zelon, Associate Justice, Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, Division Seven
Ms. Alicia Valdez-Wright, Family Law Facilitator, Superior Court of San Louis Obispo County

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ICWA for Minors’ and Parents’ Attorneys

The Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) establishes unique procedural and substantive requirements for dependency proceedings involving Indian children. Although most of the responsibility for complying with the requirements of ICWA fall to the child welfare agency and the courts, appointed counsel for minors and parents have an important role to play as well. Learn how to use ICWA to advance your clients’ interests and understand the role that you as counsel play in protecting your clients’ rights under ICWA.


Ms. Kimberly Cluff, Attorney, Forman & Associates
Ms. Ann Gilmour, Attorney, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts
Mr. David M. Meyers, Senior Attorney, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts

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Juvenile Interrogation: A New Look At An Old Problem

The recent U.S. Supreme Court case of J.D.B. v. North Carolina focused anew on an old problem. Using J.D.B. v.
North Carolina as a starting point for an interactive discussion, this workshop will explore nuances of juvenile
interrogations from the perspectives of law enforcement, the District Attorney, and the Public Defender, and
how the new neuroscience research on child brain development might be considered when interrogating
juveniles.

Mr. Matt Golde, Assistant District Attorney, Alameda County Office of the District Attorney
Ms. Rourke Stacy, Deputy Public Defender, Los Angeles County Office of the Public Defender
Mr. Michael Roosevelt, Senior Court Services Analyst, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts (Moderator)

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Domestic Violence: What You Need to Know

Domestic violence among same-sex couples is just as prevalent as among opposite-sex couples, but unique dynamics have resulted in invisibility and the potential for further victimization by the legal process. This workshop will examine domestic violence in the LGBT community and will include an overview of demographic information, terminology, and specific domestic violence information. Faculty will use a scenario to examine batterers' tactics from an LGBT framework and discuss challenges the court system may face when presented with cases of LGBT domestic violence. The workshop will also highlight actions that can be taken to protect LGBT survivors and to move toward bias-free courtrooms. For judicial officer participants, this course helps meet the requirement of CRC 10.464 for domestic violence education.

Hon. Jacqueline H. Lewis, Commissioner, Superior Court of Los Angeles County
Hon. D. Zeke Zeidler, Judge, Superior Court of Los Angeles County
Ms. Terra Slavin, Domestic Violence Lead Staff Attorney, Legal Services, Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center

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Measuring the Impact of Changes in Family Law on Court Processes

Information will be provided designed to help participants understand how to use available data to assess the effect on workload of various family law processes and procedures such as self-help assistance, caseflow management, continuance policies, and other calendar management issues. Panelists will discuss methods to
evaluate potential cost and time savings.

Hon. Thomas Trent Lewis, Judge, Superior Court of Los Angeles County
Hon. Nancy Wieben Stock, Judge, Superior Court of Orange County
Ms. Deana Piazza, Supervising Research Analyst, AOC Center for Families, Children & the Courts

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System Change to Address Children’s Exposure to Violence

This workshop will showcase the latest policy recommendations for multiple systems, intersecting with dependency courts, that engage with children exposed to domestic violence to help them heal and remain or reunite with their families. Drawing on the research and recommendations of the California Leadership Group on Domestic Violence and Child Wellbeing, the panel will highlight practical activities within and across systems and communities that will significantly aid in this process. Panelists will also offer prevention and early intervention approaches.

Hon. Katherine Lucero, Judge, Superior Court of Santa Clara County
Ms. Ann Rosewater, Consultant, California Leadership Group on Domestic Violence and Child Wellbeing
Ms. Carolyn Thomas-Wold, Director, Solano County Office of Family Violence Prevention

The Impact of Recent Criminal Justice Legislation (Realignment) on the Courts, Mediation, and Parent- Child Contact

How will Family Court Services, the courts, probation departments, and other agencies collaborate on family needs and safety issues when parents who are low-risk offenders move from state prison to county incarceration and supervision? The presenters will provide a basic overview of criminal justice concepts, a timely report of the unfolding of these new initiatives, and some suggested approaches to issues which arise within families with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated parents. As a result of recent criminal justice legislation, beginning October 1, 2011, eligible low-risk prisoners—mothers, pregnant women, and primary care providers of minor children incarcerated in California’s 33 state prisons—began serving the remainder of their sentences on parole in their county of residence. Further, eligible offenders convicted of low-risk felonies (non-violent, non-serious, non-sex offenses) will now serve their sentences in county facilities instead of state prison. Those who are parents may be requesting contact with and/or custody of their children, which may increase caseloads and create challenges for family, dependency, and probate courts.

Ms. Mary Butler, Chief Probation Officer, Napa County Probation Department
Mr. Jim Paulsen, Administrator, Probate & Family Court, Superior Court of Contra Costa County
Ms. Carol Strickman, Staff Attorney, Legal Services for Prisoners With Children

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Youth Empowerment through Teen Court

Teen courts represent an alternative to the traditional juvenile justice system for first-time youth offenders. However, all teen courts are not the same. Hear directly from youth on how their teen court works, their involvement in teen court, the impact teen court has had on their lives and their communities, and the use of restorative justice within their courts. You will learn the difference between teen court and juvenile court when the youth panel compares what would happen if a first-time youth offender commits a crime and is then sent to juvenile court or, in the alternative, is sent to teen court.

Mr. Andy Andrade, El Rancho Teen Court
Ms. Keisha Como, Antelope Valley Teen Court, Quartz Hill High School
Mr. Hart Fogel, Marin County Youth Court, Mill Valley Middle School
Ms. Celeste Gutierrez, Co-Chair, California Association of Youth Courts Student Advisory Committee
Ms. Lena Lozano, Lassen County Teen Court, Lassen High School
Ms. Nicholette Rodgers, Santa Barbara County Teen Court
Ms. Emily Strain, Moderator, Shasta County Teen Court (Moderator)

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