Interagency State Veterans Council Member Named

FOR RELEASE

Contact: Lynn Holton, Public Information Officer, 415-865-7740

Nov 14, 2011

Chief Justice Appoints Judge Richard King to Interagency State Veterans Council

San Francisco —Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye announced on Friday that she has named Judge Richard M. King, of the Superior Court of Orange County, to serve on the California Interagency Council on Veterans.

Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr., created the California Interagency Council on Veterans last August to improve how veterans’ services are coordinated across local, state, and federal governments. The council will work collaboratively to address the needs of the 30,000 servicemen and servicewomen who return to California each year.

Governor Brown’s Executive Order directs the Secretary of the California Department of Veterans Affairs to establish the council. Under the order, the Chief Justice, the president of the University of California, the chancellor of California State University, and the chancellor of the California community colleges each appoints a member to the council, which also includes representatives of each house of the Legislature and secretaries and department heads of various state agencies.

Judge King, a judge in Orange County since 2000, enlisted in the military at the age of 18 and served in the U.S. Navy from 1965-69. A member of Seabee construction operations, he served two tours of duty in Vietnam from 1967 through 1969 and was awarded the Navy Achievement Medal with Combat "V" for valor in combat.

After returning home and earning a law degree, Judge King’s first job was as an attorney with the Veterans Administration in Washington, D.C., in 1977. In 2003, he became a member of the Seabee Historical Foundation and held that position for six years. This organization has promoted the recognition of Seabee service since its inception in 1942.

Before his appointment to the bench, Judge King was a member of the Orange County District Attorney’s Office for almost 20 years, where he prosecuted homicides for 15 years.

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