Tribal Grants

Contact Info

Tribal Grants
Vida Castaneda
415-865-7874

EMAIL
vida.castaneda@jud.ca.gov

This list of grant opportunities is maintained for applicants from Tribes and Tribal courts. It is intended to provide a one-stop-shopping place for Tribes and Tribal courts to find funding opportunities to build Tribal court capacity in relation to children and families. The grants listed here do not represent all grant opportunities. If you have a successful grant application you would like posted on this website or have additional funding sources that you would like listed or new categories added, please contact Vida Castaneda.


Family Violence

CAPSTONE Centers for Multidisciplinary Research and Training in Child Abuse and Neglect (P50)
Deadline: November 19, 2015

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) will use the specialized research center mechanism (P50) to call for multidisciplinary centers to serve as the CAPSTONE for research and education n child maltreatment and as a resource for the field. The Center(s) will conduct innovative and high quality research including: 1) trials testing the efficacy and effectiveness of clinical interventions; 2) longitudinal prospective studies examining the long term impact of specific and understudied types of maltreatment including abusive head trauma, medical neglect, sexual abuse; 3) studies examining the neurobiology of abuse and neglect and implications for health outcomes; and 4) studies testing the development of screening tools and clinical assessment measures for early identification and treatment of specific types of abuse and neglect to decrease morbidity and mortality and to identify potential comorbidities.

Grants to Tribes, Tribal Organizations, and Migrant Programs for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention Programs
Deadline: April 14, 2016

The primary purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to provide financial support to selected tribes, tribal organizations, and migrant programs for child abuse prevention programs and activities that are consistent with the goals outlined by Title II of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA). The funds must support effective and comprehensive child abuse prevention activities and family support services that will enhance the lives and ensure the safety and well-being of migrant and Native American children and their families. Organizations should foster strong linkages with the State Lead Agency for the Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention Programs funded by Title II of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act. Some examples of programs that may be funded include, but are not limited to, voluntary home visiting, respite care, parenting education, family resource centers, domestic violence services, and other family support services. Grantees are strongly encouraged to implement evidence-based and evidence-informed programs and practices that reflect the unique cultural characteristics and needs of their communities. The funds must also be used to support an evaluation of the programs and services funded by the grant. Finally, programs funded should develop stronger linkages with the Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention Program (CBCAP) State Lead Agency funded under Title II of CAPTA. It is anticipated that three grants will be funded under this announcement. The funding period will be for 5 years.

Health

Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency Projects on Indian Lands - 2015
Deadline: December 15, 2015

Through this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), the Department’s Office of Indian Energy is soliciting applications from Indian tribes (including Alaska Native regional corporations, village corporations, tribal consortia, and tribal organizations) and Tribal Energy Resource Development Organizations to install (1) facility-scale clean energy and energy efficiency projects and (2) community-scale clean energy projects on Indian lands. The Funding Opportunity Announcement is soliciting applications under two Topic Areas: (1) Install clean energy and energy efficiency retrofit projects for tribal buildings (Topic Area 1); a. Clean Energy Systems (Topic Area 1.a.) b. “Deep Energy Retrofit” Energy Efficiency Measures (Topic Area 1.b.) And, (2) Deploy clean energy systems on a community-scale

Integrated Food Defense
Deadline: open applications until April 2, 2019
The Integrated Food Defense & Emergency Response Cooperative Agreement Program (IFD&ER CAP) grant awards are designed to generate food defense tools and resources that are easily replicated and can complement, aid in the development of, and/or improve State, local, Tribal and territorial (SLTT) food defense programs through unique, innovative, and reproducible projects . The known overlap between food safety (unintentional contamination) and food defense (intentional contamination) is extensive. And the pools of resources available are vast and sometimes difficult to locate and implement. As the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) recognizes the evolution of the relationship between food safety and food defense, it is critical that these programs be integrated to the maximum extent possible in order to ensure the most efficient use of resources, as well as to optimize responses to incidents and events.

California Wellness Foundation
The mission of The California Wellness Foundation is to improve the health of the people of California by making grants for health promotion, wellness education and disease prevention. Since its founding in 1992, Cal Wellness has awarded 7,690 grants totaling more than $912 million.

Foundation Funding for Native American Issues and Peoples Report

Lannan Indigenous Communities Program
The Indigenous Communities Program (ICP) supports the resolve of Native Americans to renew their communities through their own institutions and traditions. Funding priority is given to rural indigenous projects that are consistent with traditional values in the areas of education, Native cultures, the revival and preservation of languages, legal rights, and environmental protection.

At this time the foundation only accepts new grant requests from United States federally recognized tribes or Native controlled 501(c)(3) organizations whose work is solely focused in the United States.

Food Specific Molecular Profiles and Biomarkers of Food and Nutrient Intake, and Dietary Exposure (R01)
Deadline: May 27, 2017
The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to promote research on food specific molecular signatures and biomarkers of dietary consumption and to promote collaborative interactions among NIH and USDA supported nutrition researchers.

Interventions for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in Native American Populations (R01)   
Deadline: August 24, 2017
The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to develop, adapt, and test the effectiveness of health promotion and disease prevention interventions in Native American (NA) populations. NA populations are exposed to considerable risk factors that significantly increase their likelihood of chronic disease, substance abuse, mental illness, oral diseases, and HIV-infection. The intervention program should be culturally appropriate and promote the adoption of healthy lifestyles, improve behaviors and social conditions and/or improve environmental conditions related to chronic diseases, the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and other drugs, mental illness, oral disease, or HIV-infection. The intervention program should be designed so that it could be sustained within the entire community within existing resources, and, if successful, disseminated in other Native American communities. The long-term goal of this FOA is to reduce mortality and morbidity in NA communities. For the purposes of this FOA Native Americans include the following populations: Alaska Native, American Indian, and Native Hawaiian. The term Native Hawaiian means any individual any of whose ancestors were natives, prior to 1778, of the area which now comprises the State of Hawaii.
 

Healthy Habits: Timing for Developing Sustainable Healthy Behaviors in Children and Adolescents 
Deadline: Open

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) seeks to encourage applications that employ innovative research to identify mechanisms of influence and/or promote positive sustainable health behavior(s) in children and youth (birth to age 21). Applications to promote positive health behavior(s) should target social and cultural factors, including, but not limited to: schools, families, communities, population, food industry, age-appropriate learning tools and games, social media, social networking, technology and mass media. Topics to be addressed in this announcement include: effective, sustainable processes for influencing young people to make healthy behavior choices; identification of the appropriate stage of influence for learning sustainable lifelong health behaviors; the role of technology and new media in promoting healthy behavior; identification of factors that support healthy behavior development in vulnerable populations, identification of barriers to healthy behaviors; and, identification of mechanisms and mediators that are common to the development of a range of habitual health behaviors. Given the many factors involved in developing sustainable health behaviors, applications from multidisciplinary teams are strongly encouraged. The ultimate goal of this FOA is to promote research that identifies and enhances processes that promote sustainable positive behavior or changes social and cultural norms that influence health and future health behaviors.

Interventions for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in Native American Populations 
Deadline: Open

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to develop, adapt, and test the effectiveness of health promotion and disease prevention interventions in Native American (NA) populations. NA populations are exposed to considerable risk factors that significantly increase their likelihood of chronic disease, substance abuse, mental illness, oral diseases, and HIV-infection. The intervention program should be culturally appropriate and promote the adoption of healthy lifestyles, improve behaviors and social conditions and/or improve environmental conditions related to chronic diseases, the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and other drugs, mental illness, oral disease, or HIV-infection. The intervention program should be designed so that it could be sustained within the entire community within existing resources, and, if successful, disseminated in other Native American communities. The long-term goal of this FOA is to reduce mortality and morbidity in NA communities. For the purposes of this FOA Native Americans include the following populations: Alaska Native, American Indian, and Native Hawaiian. The term Native Hawaiian means any individual any of whose ancestors were natives, prior to 1778, of the area which now comprises the State of Hawaii.

Mental Health & Substance Abuse

Longitudinal Assessment of Post -traumatic Syndromes (U01)
Deadline: November 3, 2015

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages cooperative research project grant (U01) applications for a multi-site, longitudinal research platform to 1) characterize post-traumatic trajectories based on dimensions of observable behavior, neurobiological changes, and other measures that may serve as markers of risk (e.g., neural network functional connectivity, cognitive functioning, emotion regulation, biomarkers of immune response) among adult trauma patients initially seen in emergency rooms and other acute trauma settings and 2) develop algorithms to be used in the acute post-trauma time period to predict different trajectories that may be informative for future interventions.


Exploratory Clinical Trials of Novel Interventions for Mental Disorders (R61/R33)
Deadline: October 14, 2016

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support the efficient pilot testing of novel interventions for mental disorders in adults and children through an experimental therapeutics approach. Under this FOA, trials must be designed so that results, whether positive or negative, will provide information of high scientific utility and will support go/no-go decisions about further development or testing of the intervention. Studies of novel interventions include, but are not limited to behavioral, pharmacological, biologics-based, cognitive, device-based, interpersonal, physiological, or combined approaches. Support will be provided for up to two years (R61 phase) for preliminary milestone-driven testing of the interventions engagement of the therapeutic target, possibly followed by up to 3 years of support (R33 phase) for studies to replicate target engagement and relate change in the intervention target to functional or clinical effects. Ultimately, this R61/R33 FOA is intended to speed the translation of emerging basic science findings of mechanisms and processes underlying mental disorders into novel interventions that can be efficiently tested for their promise in restoring function and reducing symptoms for those living with mental disorders.


 

Social Services

Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG) Program for Indian Tribes and Alaska Native Villages
Deadline: October 22, 2015

General. All grant funds awarded in accordance with this NOFA are subject to the requirements of 24 CFR Part 1003.The purpose of the ICDBG program is the development of viable Indian and Alaska Native communities, including the creation of decent housing, suitable living environments, and economic opportunities primarily for persons with low- and moderate- incomes as defined in 24 CFR 1003.4. The Office of Native American Programs (ONAP) in HUD's Office of Public and Indian Housing administers the program.1. Single Purpose Grants. Projects funded by the ICDBG program must meet the primary objective, defined at 24 CFR 1003.2, to principally benefit low- and moderate-income persons. Consistent with this objective, not less than 70 percent of the expenditures of each Single Purpose grant shall be for activities that meet the regulatory criteria at 24 CFR 1003.208 for:Area Benefit Activities;Limited Clientele Activities;Housing Activities; orJob Creation or Retention Activities.2. Imminent Threat Grants.Imminent Threat (IT) means a problem which if unresolved or not addressed will have an immediate negative impact on public health or safety (24CFR § 1003.4) These grants are intended to alleviate or remove a threat to health or safety that requires an immediate solution as described at 24CFR part 1003,subpart E. Due to the urgency and immediacy of the threat, projects funded must be completed within 12 months of the grant award, unless there is good cause for not being able to do so. An application for IT funds is not required to be submitted by the deadline established in this NOFA. IT applications are funded on a first-come first-served basis until the amount set aside for this purpose is exhausted.

Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections
Deadline: December 1, 2015

Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections (SCHC) helps cultural institutions meet the complex challenge of preserving large and diverse holdings of humanities materials for future generations by supporting sustainable conservation measures that mitigate deterioration and prolong the useful life of collections. Libraries, archives, museums, and historical organizations across the country face an enormous challenge: to preserve collections that facilitate research, strengthen teaching, and provide opportunities for life-long learning in the humanities. Ensuring the preservation of books and manuscripts, photographs, sound recordings and moving images, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, art, and historical objects requires institutions to implement measures that slow deterioration and prevent catastrophic loss. This work is best accomplished through preventive conservation, which encompasses managing relative humidity, temperature, light, and pollutants in collection spaces; providing protective storage enclosures and systems for collections; and safeguarding collections from theft and from natural and man-made disasters. As museums, libraries, archives, and other collecting institutions strive to be effective stewards of humanities collections, they must find ways to implement preventive conservation measures that are sustainable. This program therefore helps cultural repositories plan and implement preservation strategies that pragmatically balance effectiveness, cost, and environmental impact. Sustainable approaches to preservation can contribute to an institution’s financial health, reduce its use of fossil fuels, and benefit its green initiatives, while ensuring that collections are well cared for and available for use in humanities programming, education, and research. All applicants, whether applying for planning or implementation projects, are required to focus on sustainable preventive conservation strategies.

AmeriCorps State and National Grants FY 2016
Deadline: January 27, 2016

AmeriCorps grants are awarded to eligible organizations proposing to engage AmeriCorps members in evidence-based or evidence-informed interventions to strengthen communities. An AmeriCorps member is an individual who engages in community service through an approved national service position. Members may receive a living allowance and other benefits while serving. Upon successful completion of their service, members earn a Segal AmeriCorps Education Award from the National Service Trust that members can use to pay for higher education expenses or apply to qualified student loans. Grant awards have two components: operating funds and AmeriCorps member positions. Grant award amounts vary – both in the level of operating funds and in the type and amount of AmeriCorps member positions. Unless otherwise specified, the grant generally covers a three-year project period. In approving a multi-year project period, CNCS generally makes an initial award for the first year of operation. In most cases, the application is submitted with a one-year budget. Continuation funding is not guaranteed. Contact: americorpsgrants@cns.gov 202-606-7508

Foster/Adoptive Parent Preparation, Training and Development Project
Deadline: May 27, 2016

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to award one cooperative agreement to an organization to develop a state-of-the-art foster/adoptive parent training program to include intensive preparation and development components that reflect the capacities required of successful foster/adoptive parents. This is intended to be a product that could be utilized by all states, tribes, and territories and consistently applied wherever implemented. Development of this program would include research on the common characteristics of individuals and their foster/adoptive families that have succeeded in terms of well-being and stability. Common characteristics of families that are more likely to foster and/or adopt harder to place children/youth and are successful and remain committed to the relationship will be identified and integrated into the program.

State and Tribal Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) Implementation Partnership Grants
Deadline: June 13, 2016

The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to support the creation of effective practice model partnerships between state courts and/or Court Improvement Program, state public child welfare agency and a tribe, group of tribes, or tribal consortia, including both the tribal child welfare agency and tribal court for effective implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) of 1978 (Pub.L. 95-608).

Veterans Cemetery Grants
Deadline: July 31, 2016

Grants are available for states, territories and federally recognized tribal governments. This program is implemented in 38 Code of Federal Regulations Part 39.

Surdna Foundation- Teens’ Artistic and Cultural Advancement
Deadline: Open (Letters of Inquiry)
Overall, we seek organizations that have a proven and longstanding commitment to serving teens and that emphasize skill building. We seek funding opportunities that:

  • Provide high quality arts training that integrate life skills.  These skills include:  written and oral communication, problem-solving, critical thinking, and leadership development;
  • Encourage teens to connect to their cultural identity through art-making;
  • Provide young people with a well-developed, sequential curriculum that meets the increasing skills of participants;
  • Foster strong mentoring opportunities for artists with teens;
  • Employ accomplished faculty and guest artists who engage teens in art forms that reflect their cultural interests and community;
  • Use research and evaluation tools to track the progress of teens’ success over time;
  • Share best practices in regards to training and evaluation in order to strengthen the field of youth arts training.



     

Tribal Courts

Tribal Wildlife Grants Program
Deadline: October 30, 2015

The Tribal Wildlife Grants (TWG) Program fall under the wildlife conservation grants (known as the State Wildlife Grants Program) to States and to the District of Columbia, U.S. Territories, and Tribes under provisions of the Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, for the development and implementation of programs for the benefit of wildlife and their habitat, species of Tribal cultural or traditional importance, including species that are not hunted or fished. TWG originates from the Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2002 (Pub. L. 107-63), when Congress first specified that the Service use a portion of the funds under the State Wildlife Grants Program to establish a competitive grant program available to federally recognized Tribes. This language allowed the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, through the Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), to establish a separate competitive Tribal grant program, known as TWG, which would not be subject to the provisions of the formula-based State Wildlife Grants Program, or other requirements of the State Wildlife Grants Program portion.

Indian Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG) Program
Deadline Not specified
The ICDBG Program provides eligible grantees with direct grants for use in developing viable Indian and Alaska Native Communities, including decent housing, a suitable living environment, and economic opportunities, primarily for low and moderate income persons. The ICDBG program can provide funding for recipients in the following categories: Housing: Housing rehabilitation, land acquisition to support new housing construction, and under limited circumstances, new housing construction. Community Facilities: Infrastructure construction, e.g., roads, water and sewer facilities; and, single or multipurpose community buildings. Economic Development: Wide variety of commercial, industrial, agricultural projects which may be recipient owned and operated or which may be owned and/or operated by a third party.

Tribal CASA

Currently no grant announcements are available at this time.  Please check back again soon.

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