Beyond the Bench 2019- Monday, December 16, 2019


Participants will engage in a learning-by-doing seminar on advanced trial skills. The workshop will include a short fact-pattern and lecture on advanced direct and cross examinations as well as expert testimony and the child witness.

The workshop will employ a real expert witness in the given field of study who will be available for cross examination by the participants.

Kevin Lemieux, Attorney, Law Office of Kevin Lemieux, APC
Carolyn Levenberg, Administrative Law Judge

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Hon. Vance W. Raye, Administrative Presiding Justice of the Court of Appeal, Third Appellate District
Nancy Bargmann, Director, California Department of Developmental Services
Rhea W. Boyd, MD, MPH, Pediatrician, Palo Alto Medical Foundation
Alex Briscoe, Principal, The Children's Trust Initiative
Ifasina Clear, Leadership Director, Young Women's Freedom Center
Reed Connell, MSW, Managing Partner, Director of Policy and Advocacy, Social Change Partners, LLC.
Kim Johnson, Director, California Department of Social Services
Richard Knecht, Principal, Integrated Human Services Group, Inc.
Kelly Pfeifer, MD, Deputy Director, California Department of Health Care Services
Millicent Tidwell, Chief Deputy Director, Judicial Council of California

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Cases involving domestic violence are often the most difficult cases for the courts.  Using several adult learning techniques, this workshop will help participants identify the dynamics of domestic violence, the science of risk and risk assessment, and how the presence of domestic violence impacts various court proceedings. Participants will work together to evaluate the impact of violence on adult and child victims.  Participants will identify where risk and safety information is currently gathered and shared in their current system and how to respond to barriers to safety for victims.  Participants will delve deeper and apply the information gleaned from dynamics of domestic violence to focus on risk and lethality and apply that knowledge to decision-making.

Although the principles of risk assessment will be applied in the context of family court proceedings, the course content would be valuable to those in a juvenile court assignment when determining custody or making restraining orders.

Hon. Julie Emede, Judge of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara
Hon. Janice Rosa (New York, Ret.), Judge, New York State Judiciary
Danielle Pugh-Markie, MPA, Director of Judicial Education and Leadership, Center for Court Innovation
Rebecca Thomforde Hauser, Associate Director, Gender and Family Violence, Center for Court Innovation

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This course provides an overview of the dependency legal system. The course focuses on stakeholder roles, dependency law and process, and legally mandated timelines. This course meets 4 of the 8-hour requirement for attorneys seeking to accept court-appointed cases per California Rules of Court, rule 5.660(d), and qualifies for 4 total hours of MCLE credit. This course provides 4 hours of MCLE credit at the conference. It is intended to be taken with other qualifying dependency workshops to meet the 8-hour requirement for new attorneys.

Beth Bobby, Attorney, Judicial Council of California
Melissa Gutierrez, Educational Liaison, San Diego County Office of Education
Jennifer Kelleher Cloyd, Chief Program Officer, Law Foundation of Silicon Valley
John Passalacqua, Executive Director, Dependency Legal Services
Shannon Sullivan, Assistant County Counsel, Santa Cruz County Counsel

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There has been research on trauma, its consequences and treatment approaches.  However, little attention in research has been paid to applying what we know about the relationship between racism, trauma from current life events, historical trauma and its connection with epigenetics and family violence.   Recent events in Charleston, Charlottesville and Lexington, ICE family separations, treatment of Native Americans, women of color, victims of domestic violence and sex trafficking, highlight a high level of racial animus, disinterest or cognitive dissonance in the United States.  Research on trauma in Holocaust survivors, has found that the experience of the Holocaust made changes to their genes, passed to the next generation manifesting into stress in their children.  Progressive approaches as in Dr. Joy DeGruy’s book and workbook, Post-Traumatic Slave Syndrome, helps professionals and non-professionals identify how the enslavement of Africans effects African Americans today. Science has even noted that through epigenetic(s) research, environment or exposure to trauma changes genes.  Events described above along with racism historically and in present times represent unacknowledged or unaddressed, experienced vicariously can be traumatizing.

This half-day session will examine historical and contemporary racial trauma, its roots, epigenetics, healing, and what professionals need to know and do.

Part I

Overview of trauma and trauma informed care through the lens of contemporary and historical trauma and racism.

Part II

The relationship between epigenetics, trauma and environmental factors

Part III

The connection between historical, contemporary and racialized trauma within generational family violence and provide strategies for addressing and healing.

Hon. Katherine Lucero, Presiding Judge, Juvenile Court Judge of California, County of Santa Clara
Vida Castaneda, MSW, Senior Analyst, Judicial Council of California
Katrina Claw, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Colorado
Tameka Gillum, PhD, Associate Professor, Russel Sage College
Michael Roovsevelt, Senior Analyst, Judicial Council of California
Carolyn Russell, Executive Director, A Safe Place
Yusef Salaam, Motivational Speaker, Yusef Speaks

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According to the National Resource Center on Children & Families of the Incarcerated at Rutgers, more than 2.7 million children in the U.S. have an incarcerated parent, with approximately 10 million children having experienced parental incarceration at some point in their lives.

Women are the fastest growing population in prisons and jail, the explanation for which are varied but the collateral consequences are demonstrable. Children of incarcerated women are more likely to enter the juvenile justice system, end up homeless, in foster care and experience mental health/behavioral health problems. What to do about the unnecessary removal of their children and potential dissolution of their families while maintaining public safety and addressing criminality?

This session, a panel and showing of the documentary, Tre Maison Dasan, will discuss the consequences and cost of separation on health and well-being of children with incarcerated parents and efforts to keep criminal justice involved parents connected with and not separated from their children, and resources available to parents. The panel will include Denali Tiller, the director/producer of Tre Maison Dasan, and a youth featured in the film.

Hon. Stephen Manley, Judge of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara
Dasan Lopes, Son
Stephanie Moniz, Mother
Denali Tiller, Director/Producer, Tre Maison Dasan

Tre Maison Dasan Podcast - This podcast features an interview with Denali Tiller, director and producer of the film Tre Maison Dasan, and Dasan Lopes and Stephanie Moniz who are featured in the film. Tre Maison Dasan follows three boys growing up, each with a parent in prison.
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